Meet Google Slides – The Ultimate Resume Creator!

Google got it wrong.

Google for Education created a free applied digital skills curriculum open to all. One vital digital skill is resume creation. Google’s curriculum includes a module on resume creation that recommends using Google Docs for this task. Google reached into the G Suite toolbox and retrieved the wrong tool. This is my argument that Google Slides, not Google Docs, is the right tool for resume creation.

I recently revamped my resume for a job search seeking an edtech coach position. I wanted the resume to achieve its purpose: to compel anyone reading it to invite me to interview. My resume needed to convey my innovative use of technology. Before reading any further, know that your resume is likely a laundry list of bullet points of duties performed at jobs. That is not compelling because everyone has those bullet lists! Please read Anthony Gold’s blog post, Forget Everything You Ever Learned to learn how to write a compelling resume. Then consider my advice for creating it in Google Slides.

Other Possible Tools

Before we look at why Google Slides is so good for resumes, let’s explore other tools I tried like Goldilocks trying three bears’ beds before landing on Google Slides:

  • The aforementioned Google Docs – For years I used Microsoft Word to create resumes. When I transitioned to G Suite, I used Google Docs for resumes. Have a look at the Google Docs resume templates:Google Docs resume templatesDo they look innovative or creative? I looked at the resume I produced in Google Docs saw nothing that told stories about creativity and technology innovation. So I tried something else.
  • Canva – I am a Canva superfan. I used one of Canva’s resume templates but stopped when I encountered a problem. Canva’s resume templates allow only a single hyperlink in a text box. I was unable to use multiple hyperlinks to tell the story of how I match a job’s skills.  A deal breaker. So I tried another web-based info-graphic tool, Venngage.
  • Venngage – I was able to create a visually appealing resume with Venngage. The editor allowed inserting more than a single hyperlink in a text box. Then I tried to download it as a PDF. I could not download a PDF with multiple hyperlinks unless I purchased a $20-a-month subscription. Additionally, the editor was somewhat cumbersome and not easy-to-use like Canva or Google Slides. Venngage was out. I considered how to recreate what I made in Venngage for free. Google Drawings was an option but it cannot create multiple pages in a single file. Each resume page would have to be a separate Google Drawings file. Then it hit me. There was a tool that could do everything Google Drawings does and more:

USE GOOGLE SLIDES!

Here is what I created:

Resume Elements

  • For the images of me at the top, I used three images of me presenting professional development and combined them using Canva‘s Twitter header template. I then added the artistic effect to the image using lunapic.com, a surprisingly robust website for adding effects and animation to images.
  • I changed the color of the sidebar to add some contrast. To ensure text and background had enough contrast, I used the WebAIM Color Contrast Checker.
  • I used color gradients in the small rectangle in the sidebar and the triangle in the lower-right corner. These were not essential, just some artistic flourishes I decided to include.

Why Google Slides is Great for Resumes

  • Google Slides default dimensions are not resume-friendly. However, it is easy to click “File” and “Page setup…” to use 8.5x11inch custom dimensions.
  • The ability to duplicate slides is essential. Right-clicking a slide in the preview panel on the left side of the editor allows the user to duplicate slides. This ensures precisely matching formatting on each page of the resume. Keep in mind that most potential employers will probably not read past page one.
  • Unlike Google Docs, it is easy to create and move text boxes, images, and shapes.
  • Google Slides is great for embedding on websites.
  • If a resume is viewed embedded on a website, adding a YouTube video could be very useful. A PDF viewed digitally will have a clickable link that opens the YouTube video in a new tab. Having a YouTube video on a resume that will be printed is probably not very effective. Use your judgment when considering YouTube videos.

One Google Slides Drawback

One thing Google Slides is missing is text-wrapping around images. That is the one advantage Google Docs has on Google Slides for creating resumes.

Some Resume Tips

I will conclude by sharing some tips about resumes.

  • Place whatever is most relevant and compelling to the job up top. For my last job search, I wanted to get a job as an edtech coach. The top of my resume shows me delivering professional development. The artistic effects communicate that I creatively use technology – a valuable skill for edtech coaching. Years ago, I applied for a Special Education position responsible for teaching multiple subjects. I listed my subject certifications at the very top of my resume. When I interviewed, the very first thing the interviewer said was, “I see you passed a lot of Praxis tests.” My resume told her I had what she needed for the position, exactly as intended! Do not lead with your education background. Only in rare circumstances will advanced degrees be the reason a resume results in an interview.
  • Do not use Comic Sans. Please just don’t.
  • Keep cover letters brief. No one has time to read that mess. Briefly summarize why you are a good fit. Concisely flesh it out on the resume. If you have more to share do so on your blog, website, or LinkedIn profile.

What do you think? Are you convinced Google is advocating the wrong tool for creating resumes? Will you adjust your applied digital skills curriculum to suggest Google Slides for resume creation? Please comment below or tweet me @TomEMullaney. Thanks for reading.

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Collaboration in G Suite – An Overview

G Suite for Education is a great platform for giving students feedback on their work. The apps in G Suite are also great for facilitating student collaboration.  Let’s look at how teachers can use G Suite for student collaboration.

A Quick Note

This post is meant for teachers who are almost proficient with or just learning G Suite. Additionally, this post contains nothing about add-ons, extensions, coding, or anything extra. Strictly G Suite.

Sharing (Works in Docs, Slides, Sheets, and Drawings)

G Suite allows sharing in which collaborators can receive edit access.

Give a collaborator edit access
Give a collaborator edit access

Collaborators can also receive “Can comment” access that allows for commenting in a doc, spreadsheet, presentation, or drawing.

Give a collaborator comment access
Give a collaborator comment access

Email Collaborators (Works in Docs, Slides, Sheets, and Drawings)

Email collaborators is a great way for collaborators to communicate about a file they are working on. The person initiating the conversation need not open Gmail. They also get to choose the exact collaborators they want to send a message to. Click File>>>Email collaborators… to use this function.

"Use

Assign Action Items (Works in Docs, Slides, Sheets, and Drawings)

Use the comment function and type a “+” or “@” with a collaborator’s email address to assign them an action item. That pushes an email to their inbox telling them they have been assigned an action item.

Assign an Action Item using Comments.
Assign an Action Item using Comments.

Suggesting Mode (Works in Docs)

In the Google Docs editor, notice the pencil in the upper-right corner. Click it and choose “Suggesting” in the drop-down menu.

Suggesting Mode in the Google Docs editor.
Suggesting Mode in the Google Docs editor.

Make edits. They appear as suggestions.

Suggesting Mode in Action
Suggesting Mode in Action

Collaborators can approve or reject suggestions by checking “✔️” or “✖️.”

Collaborators can accept or reject suggestions.
Collaborators can accept or reject suggestions.

Version History (Works in Docs, Slides, Sheets, and Drawings)

Version history is a great way for teachers and collaborating students to keep track of ongoing collaborations. Ever wonder which member of a group made a contribution to a G Suite file? Version history reveals all. Click File>>>Version history to access a detailed history of all edits to a G Suite file. Version history allows editors to restore a version. This is a great way to save the day if one collaborator has made many incorrect edits to a G Suite file/

Accessing Version History in Google Docs.
Accessing Version History in Google Docs.

Differentiation in Google Classroom

Let’s conclude with an easy way for teachers to turbo-charge collaboration in Google Classroom. Any post (announcement, question, or assignment) can be shared only with specific students even though the default is set to all students in a class. Have a look at how it works from Google’s The Keyword blog:

Google Classroom Differentiation
Google Classroom Differentiation

Teachers can use this to facilitate collaboration in two ways:

  1. Create a post that shares files only with group captains. Each group captain can then share their files with their group members.
  2. Create posts only for groups. This is not that difficult because of the reuse post feature. Use it to use the same post for each group with slight adjustments for each group.

For more information on differentiation in Google Classroom, please watch this video.

The Future of Collaboration in G Suite – Google Jamboard

If your district uses iPads or Play Store enabled Chromebooks, your students can use the Google Jamboard app right now. This online collaborative whiteboard is the new frontier in G Suite collaboration.  Have a look at me demonstrating it on my Chromebook. As you watch, please note – I now know what the lasso tool does. It selects elements on the screen, resizes, and moves them. It’s actually very useful.

Thank you for reading. If you would like to share your thoughts about collaboration in G Suite with me, please comment below or tweet me at @TomEMullaney.

The G Suite logo I used in the image for this blog post.

Feedback for Students in G Suite – An Overview

Teachers and students in districts that use Google for Education have access to a free suite of apps, G Suite, to create and publish. But why use G Suite? Why not Microsoft, pen-and-paper, or go full tactile and have students use typewriters? The reason to use G Suite is feedback – collaboration too, but that is a separate blog post!

A Quick Note

This post is meant for teachers who are almost proficient with or just learning G Suite. Additionally, this post contains nothing about add-ons, extensions, coding, or anything extra. Strictly G Suite.

What is so special about feedback?

One of the most valuable interventions teachers can use with students is feedback. According to Hattie and Timperley (2007) feedback is vital:

…Feedback is one of the most powerful influences on learning and achievement…The feedback that students receive from their teachers is also vital. It enables students to progress towards challenging learning intentions and goals.

– Visible Learning

Marianne Stenger shared research tips for providing students meaningful feedback in Edutopia. Number 2 on the list? The sooner the better. That’s where G Suite comes in. Here is a quick-and-dirty look at using G Suite to give students immediate feedback.

Comments (Works in Docs, Slides, Sheets, and Drawings)

Comments are a great way to give students immediate feedback as they work in G Suite. Select text or an image. There are three ways to insert a comment:

Demonstration of 3 Ways to Insert a Comment in the Google Docs Editor

Use either of these methods and type a comment:

Animated GIF of a comment inserted into a Google Doc

Comments are even better when an editor is tagged in them. This sends an email to their Gmail. Tag an editor by typing “+” or “@” followed by their email address.

Animated GIF of an editor tagged in a comment

Comment boxes serve as spaces where teachers and students can converse. Here teachers and peers can give feedback about work.

Screen capture of a discussion in a Google Docs comment

Comments “disappear” when they are resolved. The good news is they never truly disappear. The “Comments” button in the upper right of the editor keeps a record of them. This is great for keep track of all feedback students receive, whether it is from teachers or peers.

Demonstration of Comments history in Google Docs

Feedback in Google Classroom

Teachers can add a private comment to any assignment in Google Classroom. This is what it looks like as a student:

Private comment feedback from a teacher in Google Classroom

Teachers can also give feedback for students’ answers when they reply to questions in Google Classroom:

Feedback on a student's reply to a question in Google Classroom

A nice aspect of feedback in Google Classroom is that it keeps track of the number of private feedback comments exchanged between student and teacher. What a great way to document the amount of feedback provided to a student.

Google Classroom keeps track of the feedback comments exchanged between teacher and student

Google Keep (Works in Docs, Drawings and Slides)

Google Keep integration is a great way to give feedback in Docs, Drawings, and Slides. One way to do this is to have comments ready to go in a Google Keep note, then copy-and-paste them into comments.

Additionally, Google Keep can be used to give students longer-form narrative feedback in Docs, Drawings, and Slides. To make the most of this strategy, create a label for each student and each assignment in Google Keep. That way, feedback can be organized by assignment and by student.

In Docs:

In Drawings:

In Slides:

Google Forms (Response Validation and Quiz Mode)

Response validation is a great way to give students a question they work on until they get correct. I love using Response Validation for digital breakouts. Simply use short-answer questions in Google Forms, click the three dots, and choose Response Validation.

Screen capture of Response validation in Google Forms

This is a great strategy for a math problem – students receive an error message until they type the correct answer. They know immediately if they are correct or wrong – instant feedback!

Animated GIF of response validation in Google Forms

Error messages (the red text above) are a great way to scaffold for students as they work on finding an answer.

Here I demonstrate to use Response Validation:

Quiz Mode is another good way to give students feedback in Google Forms.  Quiz mode allows teachers to give different feedback for correct and incorrect answers. It also allows for links to be added to answer feedback, meaning students can be directed to a resource to re-learn questions they answered incorrectly. Watch as I demonstrate:

Two G Suite Apps That Are Not Great for Student Feedback – (Forms?! and Sites)

Didn’t I just discuss ways to use Google Forms to give students feedback? Yes, I did. Forms is great for giving feedback when they answer forms their teachers create. However, when students create Google Forms, there is no good way for teachers to give feedback inside of Google Forms. The same holds true for the Google Sites (still called New Sites). As much as I love Google Sites, I wish there was a way teachers and students could exchange feedback inside its editor.

If you would like to share your thoughts with me, please comment below or tweet me at @TomEMullaney. Thank you for reading.

The G Suite logo I used in the image for this blog post.

I Made a Jeopardy QR Code Board – You Can Too!

Jeopardy QR Codes

My colleagues Tara Hewitt and Ryan Miller developed the idea of a Jeopardy board to encourage participants at the Orange County Schools Summer Conference to tweet their learning. They wanted a physical Jeopardy board with QR codes participants could scan to access Twitter challenges. After the challenges – the answers in this Jeopardy – were written, it was up to me to use technology to make it happen.

Good thing I attend EdCamps! I met Jessica Schouweiler at EdcampWNC in Fall 2015. She shared a Google Sheet that automatically generates QR codes for websites. Make a copy for yourself. So now making QR codes is easy. But what should those QR codes point to?

I decided to use Google Slides to make the challenges. Using the Colorzilla Google Chrome extension, I matched the Jeopardy blue color and made it the background color. Each hint (fifteen in all) were separate Google Slides presentations. Each was exactly one slide. Making exact copies of each file is easy. Right click on the file in Drive and choose “make a copy.”

Screenshot 2016-06-17 at 4.31.25 PM

Then simply change the text. Make a copy of one of these slides for yourself. Then publish each slide to the web.

Screenshot 2016-06-17 at 4.35.37 PM

Screenshot 2016-06-17 at 4.37.50 PM

Screenshot 2016-06-17 at 4.38.47 PM

I then put each URL into the QR Google Sheet referenced above. I screen captured the individual QR codes and pasted each into a new Google Slides presentation with 8.5in x 11in dimensions.

I used Canva to design the category heading images. I set my image to 8.5in x 11in. I used Colorzilla to set the color to the Jeopardy blue and used the Roboto font which does not quite match the Jeopardy font but is good enough. I downloaded each as a PNG (not a JPG) to maintain quality when printing.

Screenshot 2016-06-17 at 4.45.46 PM

Here is how the board looked after printing and stapling:

Jeopardy Board

And how each Twitter challenge looked when participants scanned them:

Jeopardy on Phone

Have a look at the tweets with the conference hashtag, #FirstChoice4PD.

Thank you for reading this post. If you have any questions, please comment below or tweet me at @edtechtom.

 

Why This Teacher Loves ThingLink

ThingLink, a tool that allows for adding content that appears on top of images, is a great tool for both blended learning and student creation. Here are three reasons this teacher loves it:

Google Forms, YouTube Videos, and Google Slides

Scroll over this French Revolution ThinkLink to reveal that students can answer Google Forms and watch YouTube videos without ever leaving a ThingLink. No new tabs to open! Imagine how this can impact blended and self-paced learning!

The “Publish to the web” version of a Google Slides presentation renders nicely on a ThingLink. For an example, have a look at the ThingLink on my Sell World War I to the American Public digital breakout.

Add Sound and Images to Text

ThingLink is a great took for adding audio reading to text. Below is a screen capture of an old research paper of mine. I have added audio and imagery using ThingLink. This can open doors for students who benefit from an audio version of a text or need more than just text to learn.

Adding sound to images is especially easy with the iTunes Store version of ThingLink on iPads. It kills me to admit the iTunes app is superior to the ThingLink Android app.

Vocabulary

Check out how ThingLink can help students with vocabulary!

 

How do you use ThingLink with your students? Comment below or tweet me @TomEMullaney. Thanks for reading.

Author’s note: I originally published this is February 2016. I subsequently updated this post in April 2017 and September 2018.