Make Awesome Exit Tickets with Digital Breakouts

Exit Ticket Digital Breakout ThumbnailAuthor’s Note: This strategy is very similar to the Make Vocabulary Fun with Digital Breakouts strategy I blogged about on BamRadioNetwork’s EdWords blog.

Here is a strategy for using digital breakouts to make exit tickets that challenge and engage learners while producing useful assessment data.

Step One: Make a Google Form with the digital breakout locks.

Use data validation to set each lock (they are short answer questions) to be a key vocabulary word or concept from the lesson. Sometimes locks are referred to as “codes” as seen below. Set each question to be a required question.

Screenshot 2017-06-08 at 10.45.45 AM

Keep this to four or five locks.

Step Two: Make a Google Form with quiz mode enabled.

Click the settings gear in the upper right corner of the form to enable quiz mode.Quiz Mode

Add multiple choice questions to Google Form that assess what students learned. The number of questions should equal the number of locks in the first Google form. Choose the correct answer for each question in the form. Feedback for correct answers should be short answer questions that assess the lesson. The answers to those questions are the locks in step one. Feedback for incorrect answers should be links to remediating content.

Updated for Blog Post

Step Three: Make a one-page Google Site.

The first element is a text box that outlines a scenario where something is locked. Have fun writing it and model creativity for learners. See below for an example.

The second element is a section with another text box. Put the text, “Want some hints? Click here.” in the box. Link “here” to the Google Form with multiple choice questions from step two. Set the section style to “Emphasis 2” or “image” to call attention to this text box. This box can also contain a link to a resource that reviews the lesson content if a teacher wants to provide that scaffold. Here are two examples of what this section can look like:

 

Without Scaffold Resource

Without scaffolding recourse and section style set to “image.”

 

 

With Scaffold Resource

With scaffolding resource and section style set to “Emphasis 2.”

The third element on the page is the Google Form with the locks from step one. Simply insert it.

That’s it. The exit ticket is complete. It gives learners a way to interact with lesson content and assesses them using multiple choice and short answer questions. All a teacher has to make are:
Two Google Forms
A one-page Google Site

Please make copies of the two Google Forms in this Google Drive folder to use as templates to make a digital breakout exit ticket. Click the image below to try a US history digital breakout exit ticket I made for tenth-grade students.

Kill the Bank! Thumbnail

Thank you for reading. If you would like to discuss this strategy further, please comment below or tweet me at @TomEMullaney.

Make Vocabulary Fun with Digital Breakouts

make-vocabulary-fun-with-digital-breakouts

My latest BamRadioNetwork EdWords blog post is Make Vocabulary Fun with Digital Breakouts – my strategy for using Quizlet, Google Forms, and Google Sites to rejuvenate vocabulary review. Thank you for reading and considering it. Please comment below or tweet me at @TomEMullaney if you would like to discuss further.

Comparing Digital Breakouts in New Google Sites and Classic Google Sites

comparing-digital-breakouts-in-classic-google-sites-and-new-google-sites

The New Google Sites is live in personal GMail accounts. It is vastly different from what is now known as “Classic Sites.” Here are my thoughts on using both tools to make digital breakouts.

Looks are important.

Students are more likely to engage with a breakout if it is visually appealing. The New Sites makes much nicer looking websites. Have a look at my digital breakout templates in Classic Sites and New Sites to see the vast difference. Speaking of design, use Canva to make beautiful header images. 280 pixels high and 767 pixels wide are the ideal dimensions.

It is so easy!

Classic Sites is difficult to work with. It is not intuitive. New Sites could not be any easier to use. Make one site with it and you’re a pro. I am thrilled to share New Sites with teachers because they can point, click, and make a beautiful website!

The one drawback.

Beautiful, easy sites! So what’s the catch? There is one, and it is big. Third-party sites that embed in Classic Sites, such as EdPuzzle, ThingLink, and Quizlet, don’t embed in New Sites. Instead, there is a preview that opens a new tab when clicked:

edpuzzle-in-new-sites

New Sites is still better.

New Sites’ beauty, ease, and fantastic G Suite integration make it well worth it. EdPuzzle doesn’t work? Find a short video and pair it with a Google Form! Google Slides, PDFs in Google Drive, Docs, Sheets, and even My Maps embed flawlessly – with no code needed! Simply click and drag to move or change size.

I am perfectly willing to use only G Suite tools in New Sites while I wait for embeds to be added to the platform’s functionality.

Beware the navigation!

New Sites has two navigation settings:

new-sites-navagation

This means that all site pages are visible by default. However, you can hide pages individually:

hide-from-navigation

Here are some suggestions.

For what it’s worth, here are some suggestions from someone who made many digital breakouts in Classic Sites and can’t wait to get started in New Sites:

  • Figure out what you want your students to work with before making your digital breakout. What PDFs, Google Docs, Google Slides, YouTube videos, Google My Maps, etc. do you want your students interacting with during your digital breakout? Figure that out and your locks will flow from there.
  • Keep the elements on each page minimal. Do not overload students with too many things to view on any one page. Keep it simple and visually appealing. New Sites and Canva help those of us (like me!) who are not artistically inclined.
  • Make one lock super easy. Once students crack one lock, they are hooked. I don’t always follow my own advice on this one. I should.
  • Make digital breakouts in personal Google accounts. No one has a crystal ball. Making a Google Site in a school domain means it could go away if employment status changes. Use personal Google accounts to ensure sites do not disappear when changing jobs.
  • Beta test! Before students try a breakout, have your PLC beta test it to make sure everything is correct. Errors from incorrect links to grammar are common when making digital breakouts. Beta testing makes sure students work on a refined finished product.

Thank you for reading. Comment below or send me a tweet @edtechtom with questions.

Digital Breakouts in the New Google Sites

new-sites-digital-breakout-template-blog-post-splash-image

The new Google Sites is live. This is a template website to give you ideas for making digital breakouts in the new Sites. Currently, there is no way to copy sites or publish them as templates. The good news is that the new Sites is so intuitive that making digital breakouts is easier than ever!

If you have never tried a digital breakout, please watch this video where I take you through the template to show you how it works:

Please make copies of the files in this Google Drive folder to help you make digital breakouts. This template site uses Google Forms, an embedded PDF, an embedded YouTube video, and Google Slides. Google My Maps and Google Sheets are other G Suite tools that are great for embedding in digital breakouts.

Comment below or send me a tweet @TomEMullaney with questions.

All Digital Breakouts I make are inspired by the innovators behind BreakoutEDU,  James Sanders and Mark Hammons, as well as by the creators of Digital BreakoutEDU,  Justin Birckbichler and Mari Venturino.

Update June 4, 2017:

Have a look at my video about a small problem with digital breakouts in the new Google Sites and a solution: